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Indian Fiction - GOD IS A GAMER by Ravi Subramanian

Hi Ravi Subramanian.  I was eagerly awaiting your latest, GOD IS A GAMER.  It finally arrived and I was so pleased to be able to get a signed copy via Blogadda in exchange for an honest review.  A signed copy from an author is a treasure.  I'm going to hold on to mine for dear life because when the time comes for my to bequeath my property to my heirs, my signed first edition of the Ravi Subramanian thriller will probably be among the most coveted items.  I don't doubt it for a minute, especially with the ebook explosion.

So as I eagerly took the time to find a nice, quiet spot where I could read your thriller undisturbed.  It took some doing, as I'm a busy mother with three teens and a preteen and they all need Mom now at some time or another. Yeah, they're all grown up, but they sometimes  need someone to give them undivided attention, to listen to them and give encouragement - and that can be more intense than taking care of youngsters.  Then there's the MIL, the nemesis of the Indian wife.  But the less said about that the better. The husband is no trouble at all, but I guess I'm lucky.  So there I was, turning page after page.  Bitcoins?  A new, virtual internet currency?  Wow, I had no idea.  An American bank with branches in India and an ATM heist, executed in an army type operation?? Wow, could it be possible. A US senator assassinated on his way to meet Obama?  Chilling!  You know what, Raviji, you are a game changer when it comes to the writing of thrillers.  I mean, who needs crazed serial killers when you have high finance?  Seriously. I can't look at an ATM machine anymore without a quiver of anticipation running up my spine. I'll never think of the boring old bank down the road in quite the same way again.  Who woulda thunk, as the Americans say?  Well, some of them.  And as for gaming?  There's a virtual universe in itself.   My experience in gaming hasn't really gone beyond Tetris and Pac Man, but I do know that gaming is going extremely sophisiticated.  In fact, it's a type of storytelling now.  An online university, Iversity, ran a course on the future of storytelling last year and the basic conclusion was that gaming is the new storytelling method.  Are you sure you didn't do that course, Ravi Subramanian?

Your method of storytelling is something rather innovative and I have seen at least one other Indian thriller writer using it.  It reads like a movie script.  The chapters are short, just one scene at a time. One scene gives way to another and the story proceeds seamlessly. It's action all the way, no meaningless meandering.  In fact, reading a Ravi Subramanian, any of them, is a viable alternative to watching television or a movie.  

Yes, Ravi Subramanian, your book ticks all the boxes when it comes to fulfilling the requirements of the most discerning thriller reader.  Suspense?  Tick.  Excitement?  Tick. Characters for whom the readers can feel and with whom they can identify?  Tick.   A compulsive storyline? Tick. Tick.  Tick.  Double tick.  In other words, my message to readers is:  get this book.

And you know something else?  Your book was educational.  Yes! I found myself  Googling bitcoins and the onion router.  Just imagine that there's, like, an alternative world wide web where people with dark desires hang out without fear of exposure. Shivers up the spine again......  What a bold move, revealing the identity of the bitcoin founder, Satoshi Nakamoto.  That's a real person and, like, no-one knows who he really is.

Complaints?  Nope, not too many.  Apart for the fact that the narrative is sometimes so fast paced that it leaves me breathless, not a complaint when it comes to suspense thrillers.  But Ravi Subramanian, you need to talk to some of your characters.   Some of them have multiple personalities.  Take Tanya, for example.  She starts off as a bechari with a problem mother and ends up as a very black character indeed who is nonetheless more sinned against than sinning.  And that Nikki Tan has to be the worst mother I've ever come across, giving her daughter carte blanche to use the Onion Router for criminal activities, however soft.  And Varun?  Don't get me started on Varun! He makes my blood boil and that is just about as nice as I can be.  Tell me, Ravi Subramanian, why did you create a paranormal monster in what is so obviously a contemporary suspense thriller?  Frankenstein has nothing on this guy.   Varun is like  freaking Dracula. Be you in Brazil or in Goa, he will step out of the shadows, into your life and sweep you off your feet.  And then he will make mad, passionate love to you on the beach and .....well, I'm not the reviewer who will provide spoilers for the readers.  But I tell you, I have severe difficulty with  Varun and some of his escapades.  Is he black or is he white? Speaking metaphorically, of course.  Is he good or is he bad?  I'm still not quite sure what the heck Varun is supposed to be, but if I ever run into that guy, I will give him a piece of my mind for sure.  He's a most amoral character and all I can say is, the man is surely endowed with multiple personalities.

But Raviji, I want to thank you for a great read.  Do keep them coming.  But go easy on the multiple personality type characters. They freak me out, somewhat.




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  1. Thanks for writing such a good article, I stumbled onto your blog and read a few post. I like your style of writing...
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