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The Proud WifeThe Proud Wife by Kate Walker

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Romance is a popular fiction genre and one I enjoy occasionally.  I liked this one a lot.   A satisfying read for anyone who enjoys emotional drama.  Only two characters and a few bit players.  A couple get together to discuss their divorce and realize that they're still in love.  Through the dialogues we learn the backstory, how they met, how they parted and how they find their way back to each other again.  If there is a message and I do believe that all good fiction carries a message, it is that when you are swept away on a sea of passion and tossed on the tumultuous waves of desire, the events of life can still bring you back to earth with a bang and love needs commitment and work rather than going with the flow.  Well isn't that what our mothers used to tell us?

Kate Walker is easily one of the best writers of romantic fiction today and she writes  well.  The sexual description is tastefully done.

Romantic novels generally have fantasy settings.  Exotic locations, handsome, foreign lovers sweeping the heroine (with whom the reader identifies, obviously) off her feet.  Come to think of it, my romance was very like that.  We had it all.  Well almost.  The handsome, dark foreign man, my Indian husband, Yash for writing purposes.  We had passion.  We had the exotic locations, Dublin, London, Delhi, Kashmir.  The most exotic was definitely Dublin.  The only thing we didn't have was the freaking money and that's what brought us back to earth with a bang.  That, and culture shock, post-natal depression and the in-law blues, a universal malady which afflicts most marriages and works both ways.  We even still have our moments of passion. Well, we would if the kids would let us.

Anyway, we lived to tell the tale.  I shall be looking out for Ms. Walker's next book!



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