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Homesick!

My nephew Prabhat arrived home for a few days' leave from engineering college this morning. His parents, my brother in law Sanjeiv and his wife Tapasya, have a television in their room, and Prabhat was there watching digital video disks (DVDs). I'm in the kitchen making my breakfast, having banished my brood to their schools, when some very familiar music reaches my years - Irish instrumental music, which, let's face it, isn't heard often in this part of the globe. Intrigued, I leave the kitchen and look in the room from where the music is emanating....and I see The Corrs playing some melodious piece. The Corrs! I might as well tell you that when I left Ireland fifteen years ago, they had not yet made their mark, but now...it's quite a different story. It seems that The Corrs have done for Irish music what Michael Flatley and 'Riverdance' did for Irish dancing. I often catch a bit of Irish dancing on Star World and go crazy showing it to my kids - and anyone else who's around - to the utter indifference of the rest of the family. Riverdance and The Corrs have made aspects of Irish culture such as music and dancing very cool and very current.

I'm looking at these beautiful women in evening dress (and some nice looking men as well) playing the flute and the bodhran with ease and I'm just drinking this in - I feel myself just responding to that music. The camera focusses on the bodhran player, and her role in the piece. The bodhran is a special drum played on one side with the hand and the beat can be quite hypnotic - and I remember a line from John B. Keane's wonderful novel "The Bodhran Makers" goes something like "as Christ is the King of Kings the bodhran is the drum of drums" and next the tears are spilling, flowing, unashamedly, unselfconsciously......my nephew's looking at me as if to say "what the heck?"

Yes, what the heck? I'm homesick that's what the heck. I've been away from Ireland for eleven years. Too long, too long! How did I stay away so long?

I wanna go home!

Comments

  1. Oh Gaelikaa,I quite understand you,hope you get to go see your folks.I'm off to go see mine down south(Bangalore) in a few days...it's been a year and I miss HOME.

    You know what I think?Maybe you should go every 2yrs alone for a month,you need to that.I would if my kids were as big as yours.Or take one each time you visit ,but GO.You are strong......I wouldn't have survived so long.

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  2. It is the little things that open the floodgates, The tears are good let them come.

    I remember when I lived in Germany, one day on my way to the bank, the aroma of frying onions hit my nostrils... in that split second I was back home in the kitchen with my mother preparing lunch.

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  3. I absolutely must visit Ireland some day in my life. And I love Irish music and riverdance!

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  4. I think Charmine has the right answer. You NEED to go even if you have to go alone this time. Eleven years is too long. I go every 4 to six months. That may have to change to every six to 8, but there's no way I could stay away so long from my own country and roots.

    Of course having a daughter makes it even more important for me to get back as often as financially possible.

    The daughter piece makes it a little different, but your mother is there and I'm sure you have other family as well, plus you just need to have your feet on Irish soil every so often.

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  5. You are really ready for your trip home..the sooner the better...it's long overdue. ((x))

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  6. Have just found your blog and find it absolutely fascinating. I will be back to read (and learn) more. Sounds like you need to make plans to go home, if only on a short visit. Eleven years is a long, long time.
    Good luck
    Selina x

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  7. :) I can leave a comment! For some reason I can't do it using Firefox but Safari seems to work. Go figure.

    Good luck on getting back to Ireland. The daughter of a friend of mine is in her early forties and gets back from Sweden with her family every two years. She told me she's homesick and wishes she could move back here, but her children are too well established in Sweden and it will never happen. It's hard.

    We're all rooting for you.

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  8. I agree with Elizabeth-go visit your Mom by yourself! You need the break and the time. Of course it's easy for me to give advice-I don't have to worry about the kids and who will get them off to school and what will it be like to be away from them for two weeks to a month! (lol) I do know you're homesick as this is the 2nd or 3rd time you've written about this. I've found it's usually good to go with your instincts. For some reason you're feeling a need to go home.

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  9. I'm visiting my sister in Texas right now. Even though I've only been here for a day, there's things I miss about being home already.

    I agree, you should go home every so often and my guess is that when you're "home" you'll be ready to go HOME.

    You have TWO HOMES now!

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  10. I have never been one to yearn for England being a born nomad I just love to keep travelling. Perhaps it isnt home you miss but reliving some of those memories of home, the problem is of course that when you do go back after all these years you are going back a differnt person adn the palce will ahve changed too. How about you go and get yourself some Irish music Dvds and films and have an Irish fest . probably though taking your kids back to your natal land is probably a very good thing for them if only to see where you come from.

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