Skip to main content

Katora Cut

When we were kids, my sisters and I used to laugh ourselves silly at people who sported what we called 'bowl haircuts'. You know what I mean. The type of haircut which looks as if the hairdresser put a bowl over their head and cut around it. It leaves you with a bowl-shaped helmet of hair.

When my kids get their hair cut. Yash brings them to the roadside barbers for basic treatment like their father gets, and his father before him. Yeah, Yash gets his hair cut there too. It's really cheap. Five rupees a head. Literally. Oh, yes, simple living and high thinking, that's the best thing! Why go to one of those fancy hair salons where you'll be charged two hundred rupees each? When all the kids can have their hair cut for twenty rupees. But not on Saturdays. My father in law will not allow anyone in our house to get their hair cut on Saturdays. Something to do with the planet Saturn, if you please!

Well, my daughters Mel and Trish wouldn't be caught dead at the roadside barbers. So we girls are all growing waist length hair. Well, I cheated and went to a salon recently. It cost me the princely sum of two hundred and fifty rupees. Ladies don't go to the roadside barber anyway. I waited patiently for Yash to notice the difference in my appearance. I'm still waiting.

Neil and Nitin went to the barbers last week with their father. I was amazed when I saw Nitin's hair. It looked suspiciously like 'the bowl'. "Are you SURE the barber didn't use a bowl?' I asked Yash. "Positive! I was there the whole time!" he replied. Well I know Yash is truthful to a fault. In a couple of day Nitin's appearance became normal again. Which reminds me of an old joke: "Q: What's the difference between a good haircut and a bad haircult? A: Two weeks!"

Meanwhile, as I go through life, I pick up on a lot of the things I hear and one of those things to which I've heard reference in the last couple of days is something called the 'katora cut'! That caught my attention in a flash. Katora! That's the Hindi word for bowl! So the concept of the 'bowl haircut' is here too! I can't for the life of me remember where I've heard this reference to the 'katora cut', maybe some comedy show was going on as I was passing the television. (I seldom watch television - paucity of time, you know?).

So I can rest assured, safe in the knowledge, that wherever one lives in the world, concepts, ideas and aspirations are basically the same. Well, whether it's called the 'bowl haircut' or the 'katora cut', it still makes me laugh.

Comments

  1. Some things are happening the world over,
    again and again! ;-) I once sort of cut my son's hair, by sheer accident he then sported a bowl-shaped cut.

    Thank you for your kind comment on my blog.
    Cheers,
    merisi

    ReplyDelete
  2. Gaelikaa,I am glad you had a hair cut,you must love Yash alot to try to fit in to the mould his parents set.You deserve to be pampered every once in awhile....you work hard for it.Have a nice week.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Katora cut! First time I have heard that. Very apt. In Tamil there is a style called Chathura vattai. Square Cut. I suppose it means the same. Ranjan, my son, religiously gets his hair cut every alternate week and keeps like a Marine. Close to his skull. I have no choice. There is hardly any to cut anyway!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yikes! the bowl cut! i remember those and not fondly. Were you able to find The Weight of Glory book? If not were doing a book a month and it will range from classics to modern of every genre. Hopefully you can find another months.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This brought a chuckle... Ta love!

    ReplyDelete
  6. The bowl cut...a worldwide phenomenon.

    thanks for visiting my blog and leaving a comment.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The bowl cut is right up there with the mullet! I keep my hair long, it's too much trouble going to get it styled every 6 weeks.

    ReplyDelete
  8. thanks for visiting my blog! i like yours as well. i look forward to reading it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Lol!

    One time when I was a teenager I cut the little neighbor kid's hair as a bowl cut, literally with the bowl and everything. The kid's dad wasn't happy...oops!

    ReplyDelete
  10. 250 rupees is only 3 euros 50! That seems pretty good "value" as well!! [oooooo, how much does a day at the salon cost?? that must be pretty good value as well!]

    I developed hair cutting skills as my husband hates to go to the barber and pay 20 euro to have his thinning hair cut... I will have to tell him I am less expensive than the roadside barbers in India.

    ReplyDelete
  11. i survived a few katora cuts in my younger years...lol. thanks for dropping by yesterday.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Loong looong ago, as kids, me and my cousin cut our own hair on a saturday morning. This we did to save a few pennies for our cricket match on sunday, the next day. But unfortunately we both end up at a hairstylist who charged 3 times the normal charge:( (i.e. the money we should have used for the next four matches) to rectify that mess we made to ourselves:)....you have a lovely blog and great write-ups......

    ReplyDelete
  13. hahahah, I know that cut, in bengali we call it the bati(bowl)chaat(cut), i think the mushroom cut is an evolution of that cut too!!

    ReplyDelete
  14. My baby girl is sporting a mullet right now! Just as bad as a bowl cut! x

    ReplyDelete
  15. When Elly was small I cut her hair regularly. Now she claims I gave her a bowl cut! I was framing her fine featured face.

    Nowadays I get my haircut every 5-6 weeks at the cost of £25. If I leave it any longer my eyelids become red & scaly and I develop a headache!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for visiting me. Please let me know you were here

Popular posts from this blog

The Climate in my Hometown LBC Post

I am originally from Dublin in the Republic of Ireland. We have a maritime climate, neither too hot nor too cold. Cool, wet winters and warm summers.  We get the odd freak weather condition, like several feet of snow, once in a while to make life interesting.  Pretty ideal really.  

Now I reside in Lucknow in north India. In the Indo-Gangetic plain.  Cold dry winters, roasting hot summers and a humid rainy season.  It seems like it's always too hot or too cold. Or too humid. Humidity is something I dread.  It brings itching, rashes and all of that.  Okay, too hot will work for me. So will too cold (although I hate dry cold, that's energy-sapping). But humidity is .......not at all good. And that's a euphemism if ever there was one,. 

I wish to dedicate this post to my beloved and erudite rakhi brother Rummuser, who suggested this topic.

And thanks to freedigitalphotos.net for the above illustration, 'Paper Weather Icon Illustration' by SweetCrisis.

The Loose Blogging C…

Impatience

Many years ago, when I lived in Dublin, I met someone nice and started dating. I wasn't serious, I just thought we could have nice interesting discussions about India, which I found absolutely fascinating, as I was working in the Embassy of India back then. I had no intention of getting attached with a foreigner, with all the attendant cultural problems. I was happy living in Ireland and the idea of marriage couldn't have been further from my mind.

We both thought we could just keep things in control. One day, after a lot of emotional turmoil and denial, it hit us both that we were in love. Truly. Madly. Irrevocably. To the point where we couldn't live without each other. I'd known about the Indian system of arranged marriages and when it occurred to me that he would probably be married off by his family as soon as he returned to India, I felt physically ill at the thought. We are both tenacious and patient people. We realised that bringing our two worlds together would…

Kipling Got it Wrong! Or Eastern and Western Culture - Reflections

What Is Culture?
I’m opening this blog post with a question. What is that elusive concept which is commonly known as ‘culture? Culture is way of life. How we live. What our values are.  Our customs, attitudes and perceptions. And also, I suppose, how we express ourselves in art through, such as music, dance, theatre and cinema.  It’s quite a comprehensive area and not too easy to define, really.



The Journey
I was born in what is commonly known as ‘the west’. I lived in Ireland for the first thirty years of my life. When I was thirty, I married my husband and came out to India to live here with him. That was the beginning of an interesting journey, which is still evolving. I must have had some east/west comparison stereotypes in my head. But in India, I found that the people I met had huge stereotypes in their heads about what they called ‘western culture’ and ‘western way of life’. Not long after I arrived in India, I was struck by the number of people who said things to me like ‘in the …